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     SCIENCE IN THE QUR'AN

     THE SUBMISSION

 

Surely, those who believe (in the Qur'an), And those who follow the Jewish (scriptures), And the Christians,
the converts; anyone who (1) believes in God, and (2) believes
in the Last Day, and (3) leads a righteous life, shall have their reward with their Lord: on them Shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve. (Qur'an 2:62)

 
 
 
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Jihad = Struggle

 

HAJJ - Pilgrimage to Meccah


The 5th Pillar of Islam -  PILGRIMAGE (HAJJ)

The pilgrimage to Makkah -- the Hajj -- is an obligation only for those who are physically and financially able to perform it. Nevertheless, about two million people go to Makkah each year from every corner of the globe, providing a unique opportunity for those of different nations to meet one another. Although Makkah is always filled with visitors, the annual Hajj begins in the twelfth month of the Islamic year (which is lunar, not solar, so that Hajj and Ramadan fall sometimes in summer, sometimes in winter). Pilgrims wear special clothes: simple garments which strip away distinctions of class and culture, so that all stand equal before God.

The rites of the Hajj, which are of Abrahamic origin, include circling the Ka'aba seven times, and going seven times between the hills of Safa and Marwa, as did Hagar during her search for water. Then the pilgrims stand together on the wide plain of Arafa and join in prayers for God"s forgiveness, in what is often thought of as a preview of the Last Judgment.

In previous centuries the Hajj was an arduous undertaking. Today, however, Saudi Arabia provides millions of people with water, modern transport, and the most up-to-date health facilities.

 

The close of the Hajj is marked by a festival, the Eid al-Adha, which is celebrated with prayers and the exchange of gifts in Muslim communities everywhere. This, and the Eid al-Fitr, a feast-day commemorating the end of Ramadan, are the main festivals of the Muslim calendar. Hajj and Umrah


Hajj and Eid-ul-Adha

The Hajj, or pilgrimage to Makkah is a central duty of Islam whose origins date back to the time of Prophet Ibrahim (PBUH). It brings together Muslims of all races and tongues for one of life's most moving spiritual experiences. For 14 centuries, countless millions of Muslims, men and women from all over the world, have made the pilgrimage to Makkah, the birthplace of Islam. In carrying out this obligation, they fulfill one of the five "pillars" of Islam, or central religious duties of the believer


Hajj is the once-in-a-lifetime-obligatory pilgrimage of Muslims to Makkah, Saudi Arabia during Dhul Hijjah (month for Hajj). Hajj, the Fifth Pillar of Islam, is absolutely required on all capable Muslims. Umrah, when performed independent of Hajj, is the optional lesser pilgrimage and may be accomplished anytime during the year.

 

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